The rise of technological pessimism and political populism as well as the endurance of climate change skepticism are a few examples of social phenomena that are challenging the conduct of scientific research in the Arctic. The unprecedented nature of anthropomorphic global warming is, in turn, an example of the kind of techno-scientific uncertainty that the organization of the future governance of evolving global dynamics in the Arctic needs to take into consideration. This early-career workshop discusses challenges and opportunities for inter-disciplinary coordination and multi-stakeholder cooperation in the Arctic through the notion of boundary object from Science Technology Studies (STS).

The first part of the session is a roundtable-session with presentations from three early-career and three senior-scientists about their experiences in participating and organizing multi-disciplinary or multi-stakeholder workshops or projects that have, in one way or another, used specific material entities to facilitate communication and cooperation between participants from different social worlds (Thursday 6.4. at 14.-15.30 in the Virgo Room).

The second part of the session follows a more traditional workshop format. It starts with an in depth presentation of the kind of work the boundary object notion has been applied to in STS. This presentation is followed by a set of individual and group exercises in communicating one’s own work, interests and goals to different audiences and social worlds by using the insights of this notion.

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The workshop focuses on applications of commercial satellite imagery for polar science. Instructor-led short courses include Discovering Geospatial Data at the Poles, DEM Extraction from Stereoscopic Imagery, Georeferencing Maps and Aerial Imagery, and more. The PGC Boot Camp also hosts visiting expert speakers and offers dedicated project work time for one-on-one support from PGC staff.

Visit the Polar Boot Camp website for details. Application closes June 14th, 2017!
http://bootcamp.pgc.umn.edu/

The 2017 International Conference on Arctic Science: Bringing Knowledge to Action will: Bring together diverse expert communities ranging from scientists to decision-makers in order to identify, explore and create mechanisms and venues where science and knowledge can inform the development of policies and decision-making: http://www.amap.no/documents/download/2878/inline

The 2017 GRC on Polar Marine Science "Understanding Ecosystem Change through Time Series Observations, Technological Advances, and Biophysical Coupled Modeling” will bring together leading investigators in Antarctic and Arctic marine research.  Using a tradition of excellence facilitated by the Gordon Research Conferences (GRC), participants will present and discuss cutting edge interdisciplinary polar science observations, technological advancements and biophysical modeling activities associated with polar time series studies. The unique GRC format incorporates invited science talks by experts working at both poles, which are moderated by discussion leaders, and are followed by in-depth open discussion periods. We will have a highlight session daily for the afternoon poster session. The format of the GRC inspires scientists from different disciplines to synthesize new ideas and to brainstorm about the ongoing status and change in the polar oceans.

In both the Antarctic and Arctic, ecosystem variables such as sea ice dynamics, atmospheric and ocean exchange, biogeochemical cycles, food web dynamics, and sediment proxies have in the past and are currently responding to climate and environmental change. How the ecosystem is responding to ongoing stressors in the marine environment and devising appropriate modeling approaches to predict future change are important foci for polar science. The 11th GRC on Polar Marine Science will primarily discuss new findings and uncertainties in observing marine time series data, the use of developing technology for collecting those observations, and successes and challenges emerging from time series observations and biophysical modeling that can be used to accurately forecast future ecosystem response.

A Gordon Research Seminar (GRS) will occur the weekend prior to the 2017 Polar GRC to provide a forum for graduate students and postdoctoral scientists to present their work and interface with their peers and experts in variable disciplines. The major focus at the 2017 GRS will be on innovative marine technology including autonomous and remotely operated instruments, camera systems, advanced laboratory techniques, and numerical modeling. The early career scientists will present data and discuss how these technological advances improve the physical-biological understanding of polar marine ecosystems. Financial support will be offered in priority to graduate students and postdoctoral fellows attending both the GRC and the preceding GRS.

 

The preliminary program, including speakers and discussion leaders, is posted on the GRC website http://www.grc.org/programs.aspx?id=12642, including instructions on registering for the conference and other logistics. 

The 2017 GRC on Polar Marine Science "Understanding Ecosystem Change through Time Series Observations, Technological Advances, and Biophysical Coupled Modeling” will bring together leading investigators in Antarctic and Arctic marine research.  Using a tradition of excellence facilitated by the Gordon Research Conferences (GRC), participants will present and discuss cutting edge interdisciplinary polar science observations, technological advancements and biophysical modeling activities associated with polar time series studies. The unique GRC format incorporates invited science talks by experts working at both poles, which are moderated by discussion leaders, and are followed by in-depth open discussion periods. We will have a highlight session daily for the afternoon poster session. The format of the GRC inspires scientists from different disciplines to synthesize new ideas and to brainstorm about the ongoing status and change in the polar oceans.

In both the Antarctic and Arctic, ecosystem variables such as sea ice dynamics, atmospheric and ocean exchange, biogeochemical cycles, food web dynamics, and sediment proxies have in the past and are currently responding to climate and environmental change. How the ecosystem is responding to ongoing stressors in the marine environment and devising appropriate modeling approaches to predict future change are important foci for polar science. The 11th GRC on Polar Marine Science will primarily discuss new findings and uncertainties in observing marine time series data, the use of developing technology for collecting those observations, and successes and challenges emerging from time series observations and biophysical modeling that can be used to accurately forecast future ecosystem response.

A Gordon Research Seminar (GRS) will occur the weekend prior to the 2017 Polar GRC to provide a forum for graduate students and postdoctoral scientists to present their work and interface with their peers and experts in variable disciplines. The major focus at the 2017 GRS will be on innovative marine technology including autonomous and remotely operated instruments, camera systems, advanced laboratory techniques, and numerical modeling. The early career scientists will present data and discuss how these technological advances improve the physical-biological understanding of polar marine ecosystems. Financial support will be offered in priority to graduate students and postdoctoral fellows attending both the GRC and the preceding GRS.

The preliminary program, including speakers and discussion leaders, is posted on the GRC website http://www.grc.org/programs.aspx?id=12642, including instructions on registering for the conference and other logistics. 

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