The 2017 GRC on Polar Marine Science "Understanding Ecosystem Change through Time Series Observations, Technological Advances, and Biophysical Coupled Modeling” will bring together leading investigators in Antarctic and Arctic marine research.  Using a tradition of excellence facilitated by the Gordon Research Conferences (GRC), participants will present and discuss cutting edge interdisciplinary polar science observations, technological advancements and biophysical modeling activities associated with polar time series studies. The unique GRC format incorporates invited science talks by experts working at both poles, which are moderated by discussion leaders, and are followed by in-depth open discussion periods. We will have a highlight session daily for the afternoon poster session. The format of the GRC inspires scientists from different disciplines to synthesize new ideas and to brainstorm about the ongoing status and change in the polar oceans.

In both the Antarctic and Arctic, ecosystem variables such as sea ice dynamics, atmospheric and ocean exchange, biogeochemical cycles, food web dynamics, and sediment proxies have in the past and are currently responding to climate and environmental change. How the ecosystem is responding to ongoing stressors in the marine environment and devising appropriate modeling approaches to predict future change are important foci for polar science. The 11th GRC on Polar Marine Science will primarily discuss new findings and uncertainties in observing marine time series data, the use of developing technology for collecting those observations, and successes and challenges emerging from time series observations and biophysical modeling that can be used to accurately forecast future ecosystem response.

A Gordon Research Seminar (GRS) will occur the weekend prior to the 2017 Polar GRC to provide a forum for graduate students and postdoctoral scientists to present their work and interface with their peers and experts in variable disciplines. The major focus at the 2017 GRS will be on innovative marine technology including autonomous and remotely operated instruments, camera systems, advanced laboratory techniques, and numerical modeling. The early career scientists will present data and discuss how these technological advances improve the physical-biological understanding of polar marine ecosystems. Financial support will be offered in priority to graduate students and postdoctoral fellows attending both the GRC and the preceding GRS.

 

The preliminary program, including speakers and discussion leaders, is posted on the GRC website http://www.grc.org/programs.aspx?id=12642, including instructions on registering for the conference and other logistics. 

The 2017 GRC on Polar Marine Science "Understanding Ecosystem Change through Time Series Observations, Technological Advances, and Biophysical Coupled Modeling” will bring together leading investigators in Antarctic and Arctic marine research.  Using a tradition of excellence facilitated by the Gordon Research Conferences (GRC), participants will present and discuss cutting edge interdisciplinary polar science observations, technological advancements and biophysical modeling activities associated with polar time series studies. The unique GRC format incorporates invited science talks by experts working at both poles, which are moderated by discussion leaders, and are followed by in-depth open discussion periods. We will have a highlight session daily for the afternoon poster session. The format of the GRC inspires scientists from different disciplines to synthesize new ideas and to brainstorm about the ongoing status and change in the polar oceans.

In both the Antarctic and Arctic, ecosystem variables such as sea ice dynamics, atmospheric and ocean exchange, biogeochemical cycles, food web dynamics, and sediment proxies have in the past and are currently responding to climate and environmental change. How the ecosystem is responding to ongoing stressors in the marine environment and devising appropriate modeling approaches to predict future change are important foci for polar science. The 11th GRC on Polar Marine Science will primarily discuss new findings and uncertainties in observing marine time series data, the use of developing technology for collecting those observations, and successes and challenges emerging from time series observations and biophysical modeling that can be used to accurately forecast future ecosystem response.

A Gordon Research Seminar (GRS) will occur the weekend prior to the 2017 Polar GRC to provide a forum for graduate students and postdoctoral scientists to present their work and interface with their peers and experts in variable disciplines. The major focus at the 2017 GRS will be on innovative marine technology including autonomous and remotely operated instruments, camera systems, advanced laboratory techniques, and numerical modeling. The early career scientists will present data and discuss how these technological advances improve the physical-biological understanding of polar marine ecosystems. Financial support will be offered in priority to graduate students and postdoctoral fellows attending both the GRC and the preceding GRS.

The preliminary program, including speakers and discussion leaders, is posted on the GRC website http://www.grc.org/programs.aspx?id=12642, including instructions on registering for the conference and other logistics. 

Second AMAP/EU-PolarNet Stakeholder Workshop 20th September 2016, Riga/Latvia

The second AMAP/EU-PolarNet stakeholder workshop „Research Needs on Arctic Ecosystems and Ecosystem Services“ will take place on 20th September 2016 at this year’s ICES Annual Science Conference in Riga, Latvia.

The central theme of this workshop is research needs for a better understanding of Arctic marine ecosystems and ecosystem services and the factors that influence their functioning in the light of the many changes occurring in the Arctic associated with climate change. The workshop will look at a wide range of processes, ranging from oceanographic and biogeochemical processes to the many human uses of this area, including fisheries and shipping.

For more information visit the EU-PolarNet website http://www.eu-polarnet.eu/news-and-events/conferences-and-workshops/#c5170

Arctic Data Collaboration Team Meeting with a focus on Arctic Data and Systems Interoperability: opportunities, challenges and the way forward
Oct 20, 2016 1 - 2 pm Eastern Daylight Time

You are invited to the next meeting of the Arctic Data Collaboration Team which will focus on Arctic Data and Systems Interoperability: opportunities, challenges and the way forward which will be held on October 20 at 1:00 EDT. For more information and to view the agenda, click the link below. Team co-lead Peter Pulsifer has also posted an update with more information about the meeting at http://www.iarpccollaborations.org/members/updates/7164.

For more details go to:
www.iarpccollaborations.org/members/events/3711

Tuesday, 6/21, 1-2pm EDT:  Google+ Hangout on Arctic water issues

The State Department will be doing our first Arctic-themed Google+ Hangout ever early next week on water issues in the region. During the hangout, Senior Arctic Official Julie Gourley and Bill Griffith from the Water Division of Alaska’s Department of Environmental Conservation will discuss water-related environmental, health, and economic challenges in the Arctic and how the Arctic Council, the wider international community, academics, and entrepreneurs are tackling water-related issues.  No registration necessary. To join, simply go to this link at 1pm on Tuesday: https://plus.google.com/u/0/events/cuo3eg1l7c4o519oef2hmo0vqrg

Link to Tweet on this event here – retweets welcome! https://twitter.com/USArctic/status/743911146856423426  

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